Watch every goal Ryan Kesler scored last season (Part 3)

And finally, we come to the last run of Ryan Kesler goals for which Vancouver fans are ever going to cheer. It’s been amusing watching the backlash to these posts. People: we do this every year. Plus it’s not like Kesler’s the only guy in the videos. More often than not, it’s about seeing what the other guys do to contribute.

Still, I understand that Kesler has become public enemy no. 1 around these parts, and fans don’t want to see him smiling or celebrating ever again. People: your nightmare ends here.

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Watch every goal Ryan Kesler scored last season (Part 2)

Ryan Kesler may be gone, but we can’t forget him just yet. The outbound jerk scored 25 goals for the Canucks last season, which means we have to account for them in our annual series, in a three-part series. The humanity!

We know, you aren’t so fond of him anymore. But before you write him off completely, remember some of the good times. Here are eight more of said good times.

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Watch every goal Ryan Kesler scored last season (Part 1)

I have to admit, I’ve been putting off this edition of our annual “Every Goal” series. It’s partly because we’ve been doing the series in more-or-less ascending order, starting out with the players who scored a couple or a few goals and working our way up the lineup, but it’s also because the scorer of these particular goals has a certain amount of baggage attached to him these days.

But we’ve already chronicled every other goal scored last season, so it’s time for the 25 scored by Ryan Kesler.

It didn’t take long for Kesler to go from fan favourite to persona non grata in Vancouver. It wasn’t just that he asked for a trade, but that he also limited the potential trade destinations with his No Trade Clause. He was well within his legal rights to do so, but it turned what could have been a frantic bidding war into a far more meagre return and left a sour taste in the mouths of Canucks fans.

The backlash seemed particularly strong because of his particular brand of jerk puck. As we here at PITB were fond of saying when he was still a Canuck, “Sure, he’s a jerk, but he’s our jerk.” Canucks fans had spent years defending his jerkish tendencies, so when he was no longer “our jerk” he became just a jerk.

But that jerk did lead the Canucks in scoring last season and, though he may be easy to replace in the hearts of Canucks fans, he will be much more difficult to replace on the ice. Let’s go over every goal he scored last season to see why, starting with his first eight goals.

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Watch every goal Chris Higgins scored last season (9-17)

Is Chris Higgins a top-six forward? It’s a question I hear asked frequently by Canucks fans and it comes with an implicit assumption: no, he’s not. From what I’ve seen from Canucks fans, they seem to be agreed that the Canucks have a glut of third-line wingers and players like Higgins and Jannik Hansen end up on the second line simply because the team has no one else to put there.

I think this comes from an unrealistic view of the second line. Last year, while looking at David Booth, I estimated that a second-line player should produce between 31-to-51 points in an 82-game season and/or 15-to-25 goals. That was based on points and goals produced by second line forwards in the 2011-12 season and it’s still a pretty good guideline for what we should expect from the second line.

Higgins scored 17 goals and 39 points. While in the lower half of second line players, he still fits in that bracket and it’s important to note that he still produced like a second-line forward when most of the team fell well below expectations and while facing some of the toughest competition of his career. The Sedins both performed like second-line forwards last season, albeit top-tier second line forwards. Complaints about Higgins not belonging on the second line just don’t make any sense.

With that out of the way, let’s look at his last nine goals from last season.

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Watch every goal Chris Higgins scored last season (1-8)

The general opinion of Canucks fans is that pretty much no one had a good season under John Tortorella apart from, perhaps, Chris Tanev and Chris Higgins. In Higgins’ case, it’s simply that he performed about as well last season as he did in the previous two seasons, if not slightly worse. The reason we [...]

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Watch every goal Daniel Sedin scored last season (Part 2)

It’s time for part two of every goal that Daniel Sedin scored last season, which highlights one positive: Daniel scored enough goals that we had to split them into two posts. It’s not as good as the 2010-11 season, when we spent an entire week recapping Daniel Sedin’s goals, of course, but it could have been worse.

It’s also a bit depressing that he’s one of just three players who need their goals split over more than one post.

The biggest reason for Daniel’s paltry goal totals was his 23-game goalless drought through January, February, and most of March. To put that into perspective, his longest stretch without a goal in the previous season was 8 games and that wasn’t a great season for Daniel either.

Incredibly, you have to go all the way back to Daniel’s sophomore season, to when he was just 21-years-old, to find a longer goalless drought. He went 25 games without a goal in the 2001-02 season, finishing with just 9 goals. Good news! 33-year-old Daniel is better at hockey than 21-year-old Daniel, nearly doubling his goal total from his sophomore season. See, there’s always a silver lining.

Here are the final 8 goals Daniel scored last season.

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Watch every goal Daniel Sedin scored last season (Part 1)

The 2013-14 season started off reasonably well for Daniel Sedin. He scored 6 goals in October, putting him on pace for another 30+ goal season.

Things got steadily worse through the rest of 2013, scoring just 4 goals in November and 3 goals in December, but it was 2014 that brought the real misery. Incredibly, Daniel went goalless through January and February, apart from one measly goal during the Olympics. Then, after the Olympics were over, Daniel suffered a leg injury in the debacle of an outdoor game, keeping him out of the lineup for most of March.

It took until March 26th for Daniel Sedin to score his first goal as a Canuck in 2014. Between him and Alex Burrows, the Canucks had two of the most bizarre goal droughts in the entire NHL last season.

How in the world does that happen? He finished the season with just 16 goals, his lowest total since 2003, aside from the lockout-shortened 2013 season. Not coincidentally, he also posted the lowest shooting percentage of his career, which may give some hope that he can turn things around next season. Alternately, if you’re feeling pessimistic, you could argue that he just hasn’t been the same since Duncan Keith gutlessly concussed him back in 2012.

I’m a little more optimistic: with either Radim Vrbata or a non-cursed Alex Burrows on his opposite wing and a powerplay that isn’t a garbage fire, Daniel should be able to get back to at least 25 goals next season. Part of the reason for my optimism came from watching his goals from last season, some of which are fantastic. Here are the first 8.

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Watch every goal Chris Tanev scored last season

Almost nobody flourished under John Tortorella. Almost nobody. Somehow, Chris Tanev found a way. Tortorella admitted early on that Tanev was really the only defender to get the new system, which was both a good thing and a bad thing, if you think about it. It’s never good when five of the Canucks’ six defencemen don’t really know what they’re doing out there. But at least it confirmed our suspicions that Tanev is a highly-adaptable blueliner of above-average intelligence.

For this reason, and thanks to Tanev’s continued development, he really stood out in 2013-14, and looks poised for a top-four role on the right side next season. (It’s part of why the Canucks felt comfortable letting Jason Garrison go.)

But there’s another reason Tanev stood out last year: he scored six goals. After taking nearly 100 games to score even one, it seemed unlikely he’d be a source of much offence over his career. But now there’s some hope, especially since he seems to have found a weapon in his wrist shot. Here’s every goal Chris Tanev scored last season.

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Watch every goal Brad Richardson scored last season

Last July, when the Canucks signed Brad Richardson to a two-year deal, I rated the signing as “Pretty Okay.” That’s exactly how I feel about Richardson’s season. Since the rest of the team was mostly abysmal, “pretty okay” looked a lot better than normal.

Richardson was absolutely buried in the defensive zone all season, starting the vast majority of his shifts in the defensive zone. Most of the time when we talk about a player starting the majority of his shifts in the defensive zone, we’re talking in relation to his offensive zone starts, ignoring the neutral zone. This isn’t the case for Richardson. He was on the ice for 444 defensive zone faceoffs at 5-on-5, far more than in the defensive zone (217) or neutral zone (267). No one else on the Canucks came even close to that.

With that kind of deployment, it’s not surprising that his Corsi% was below 50%. Starting that often in the defensive zone all but guarantees that your team will be out-shot while you’re on the ice. Honestly, it’s impressive that his possession statistics weren’t worse and it’s definitely impressive that he managed to score 11 goals, though it comes as no surprise that he had the highest shooting percentage of his career while doing so.

It’s also worth noting that once Richardson was off the fourth line and skated on the third line with Zack Kassian and David Booth, his Corsi% popped above 50%. That third line was legitimately effective and it will be interesting to see if Richardson can out-battle Shawn Matthias, Bo Horvat, and Linden Vey for the third-line centre role in training camp. If not, he’ll have a better linemate on the fourth line in Derek Dorsett, who performed even better with similar usage as Richardson.

But enough about that: let’s look at Richardson’s 11 goals and see what can be gleaned from them.

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Watch every goal Jannik Hansen scored last season

Like it was for most of the Canucks, last season was a disappointment for Jannik Hansen. After scoring 10 goals in 47 games in the lockout-shortened 2013 season, he scored just one more in 71 games last season. He was third in points behind only the Sedins in 2013. Last season, he was 12th.

Hansen has long been in a sort of limbo, seemingly always poised on the brink of becoming a legitimate top-six forward, yet faltering every time he’s put in that position. Last season, Hansen appeared to completely change his game depending on what line he was put with, trying to be Alex Burrows for the Sedins, a playmaking winger for Kesler, and a one-dimensional checker for the the third line.

Hansen spent so much time trying to be someone else that he seemed to forget what made him successful in the first place. He’s not primarily someone who can be a pestering, forechecking net-front presence like Burrows, or a playmaker, or a defensive forward. He’s all three of those things in equal measure. He seemed to limit himself to just one aspect of his game depending on his line and it led to the worst offensive season of his career.

It’s not all bad news, however. Just like a lot of his success in the 2013 season was driven by the percentages, so was a lot of his failure in the 2013-14 season. He also managed to score 11 goals, his third straight season with a double-digit goal total.

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Watch every goal Mike Santorelli scored last season

Not since Magnus Arvedson has a Canuck player’s time in Vancouver ended as frustratingly as Mike Santorelli’s. Like Arvedson, who was on fire with the Sedins before a knee injury ended his career, Santorelli was going when he left, with 10 goals and 18 assists in just 49 games. On many nights, he looked like the Canucks’ best forward. But then he was felled by an injury, and by the time he got healthy again, the season was over.

In many ways, Santorelli was the perfect Mason Raymond replacement, working his way up to a top-six role and impressing there before suffering an injury, then leaving for the Toronto Maple Leafs.

It’s a shame, really, that Santorelli didn’t get a chance to finish the season healthy in Vancouver, because he looked like an absolute steal. Granted, some of that was luck — like, for instance, the fact that everyone else was sucking, which made him look even better — but still, as his 10 Canuck goals illustrate, he was a pretty good player for this team.

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Watch every goal Alex Edler scored last season

Alex Edler had a bizarre season. Despite posting positive underlying numbers that saw the Canucks outshoot their opposition whenever Edler was on the ice at even-strength, Edler had a league-worst minus-39 plus/minus rating. Everything went wrong for Edler at even-strength and things didn’t get any better for him on special teams, since the Canucks’ powerplay was entirely composed of cold, wet garbage last season.

Oilers blogger Tyler Dellow wrote an article a few months ago called “The Big Mistake,” which, at the time I’m writing this, wasn’t available on his site because his server is also composed of cold, wet garbage. But the gist of the article was that one of the main ways our eyes deceive us when we watch and analyze hockey games is that the big mistakes stand out to us more than anything else — the giveaway in the defensive zone, the errant drop-pass in the neutral zone, or the mis-timed pinch in the offensive zone that leads to a breakaway. Those big mistakes are like a paint roller covering up the tiny brushstrokes that form the big picture.

This connects to Edler pretty clearly. One could argue — and more than one Canucks fan has — that Edler is more prone to making big, costly mistakes than any other Canucks defenceman. It’s these mistakes, the argument goes, that led to the league-worst plus/minus rating.

I would argue, and the underlying statistics seem to bear this out, that Edler was not significantly worse last season than in previous years. I would argue that he’s always made those “big mistakes,” generally because he’s on the ice and handles the puck a lot, but this past season they were more noticeable as they more often led to goals against. Meanwhile, due to an obscenely low team shooting percentage when Edler was on the ice, his offensive contributions couldn’t outweigh the results of those mistakes.

That’s why Edler is going to be fascinating next season. If he plays at the same level but his percentages regress to the mean, he’ll have a pretty good season and fans and media alike will crow about his bounceback year, despite nothing really changing.

In any case, in the midst of the absurdity, Edler still managed to tie Jason Garrison for the team-lead in goals from a defenceman despite playing 18 fewer games. Here they are.

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Watch every goal Yannick Weber scored last season

One month ago today, the Canucks re-signed depth defenceman Yannick Weber, and it’s no secret as to why. Three of Weber’s six goals last season came against the Calgary Flames. He’s a flame-killer, like water, or compressed carbon dioxide, and considering how often the Canucks play the Flames, it’s just prudent to have retained him.

Either that or they simply liked his play in a depth role, and feel his offensive gifts will be more use to him in Willie Desjardins’ system. Weber never looked truly out of place (except for those unfortunate games he was used as a forward), and he looked right at home with the Canucks in the offensive zone, where his best weapon — a wicked one-timer — could be showcased.

It’s definitely showcased here, as we run down all six of Weber’s goals in his first season as a Canuck.

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Watch every goal Kevin Bieksa scored last season

In his first full season with the Canucks, 2006-07, Kevin Bieksa scored 12 goals, good for second among Canucks defencemen behind Sami Salo. It’s still his career high. He came close two years later, scoring 11 goals, but he hasn’t scored in double digits since 2009. Perhaps he should get more powerplay time: in both those seasons, he led Canucks defencemen in powerplay goals.

That may seem odd to say as Bieksa doesn’t really fit the profile as an ideal pointman on the powerplay. He doesn’t have a heavy slap shot, relying more on his wrist shot to shoot through traffic, and he isn’t known for being a playmaking quarterback, but when he entered the NHL he excelled with the man advantage.

In 2006-07, Bieksa was second among Canucks defencemen in powerplay ice time, and he led all Canucks defencemen in powerplay ice time the next two seasons. But then the Canucks traded for Christian Ehrhoff and Bieksa found himself relegated to the second powerplay unit. Even after Ehrhoff left, Bieksa was fourth among Canucks defencemen in powerplay time behind Alex Edler, Sami Salo, and Dan Hamhuis. Sami Salo left in free agency, but he was replaced by Jason Garrison.

Bieksa doesn’t have a reputation for being good on the powerplay, but he produced goals when he was on the first unit in his first few seasons. With Garrison gone, there’s an opportunity for Bieksa to join Edler on the blue line with the first unit, with Yannick Weber arguably his only competition. While that pairing can be a tire fire at even strength, the powerplay should minimize their weaknesses.

With more time on the powerplay, could Bieksa once again score 10+ goals next season? Maybe. In the meantime, let’s take a look at the four goals he scored last season, just one of which came on the powerplay.

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Watch every goal Zack Kassian scored last season

There weren’t a lot of bright spots in the Canucks’ 2013-14 season, but the burgeoning play of Zack Kassian was definitely among them. Despite never really managing to earn John Tortorella’s trust by demonstrating the two-way play that earns one top-six icetime, Kassian still managed to put up 14 goals and 15 assists.

The assists may have been the nicer sign. Watching Kassian for two seasons in Vancouver, it was clear that he had some extraordinary vision — it just wasn’t translating into helpers. But finally, in the back half of the Canucks’ season, as everything else was falling apart, Kassian appeared to be putting it together. By season’s end, he looked like a guy capable of, perhaps, a 20-and-20 season, especially if he finds some chemistry with a centre and gets a spot in the top-six next season.

But enough about next season. Let’s talk about last season, in which Kassian did a lot of good stuff. In his collection of goals, you’ll see power moves, incredible shots, and some deceptive speed for a big man. Here’s every goal Kassian scored in 2013-14.

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Watch every goal scored by a guy who only scored once last season

Here’s how it works at the Every Goal project: you score two goals, you get your own post. But all the guys that tallied just one get lumped into one post, where we chuckle at their rare and random offensive contribution.

This group is always a mixed bag: prospects, fourth-liners, guys that just passed through on their way to Europe, and occasionally, guys that didn’t have a particularly good season. Fortunately, there’s nobody from the latter camp this year (although we were worried about Alex Burrows there for a sec).

This year’s one-goal guys are as follows: defencemen Ryan Stanton, Frank Corrado, and Raphael Diaz, and forwards Kellan Lain, Darren Archibald, and Jeremy Welsh. Diaz and Welsh and already gone, but the other four will be back next year. Think any of these guys have it in them to get their own post next year?

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Watch every goal Zac Dalpe scored last season

The Canucks acquired Zac Dalpe last September, along with Jeremy Welsh, sending ECHL forward Kellan Tochkin and a fourth round pick to the Carolina Hurricanes in return. At the time, it looked like a brilliant trade for Mike Gillis, as Tochkin has no NHL future and a fourth round pick has little chance of making the NHL, while Dalpe was still touted by some as a potential top-six forward and Welsh looked capable of filling a role on the third or fourth lines.

Nine months later, neither Dalpe nor Welsh are with the Canucks. Dalpe was not extended a qualifying offer by the new Canucks regime, sending him to free agency, where he was picked up by the Buffalo Sabres.

While Dalpe wasn’t particularly good with the Canucks, he also didn’t get much of an opportunity. He spent the bulk of his 55 games on the fourth line, both at centre and on the wing, and was generally buried in the defensive zone when he was on the ice. He was also saddled with Tom Sestito all season.

When Sestito and Dalpe were together, the Canucks took a mere 40.7% of the shot attempts, which is atrocious. When Dalpe was able to get away from Sestito, that number jumps up to 48.5%. That’s still not great, mind you, but it’s at least approaching respectable. What’s more, when he was on the ice with better players like Zack Kassian, David Booth, Jannik Hansen, and Chris Higgins, Dalpe didn’t drag them down, posting a positive shot attempt differential with each of them.

Even when Dalpe was with fourth line call-ups like Darren Archibald and Jeremy Welsh, he was able to post a positive shot attempt differential. The Canucks could have had a fourth line last season that didn’t constantly get trapped in the defensive zone.

Basically, without Sestito and with good or even half-decent players, Dalpe was a positive puck possession player. If Dalpe hadn’t played with Sestito last season, he might have gotten another shot with the Canucks.

Alas, it was not to be, and Dalpe’s only shots with the Canucks were the 52 he took last season, 4 of which went into the opponent’s net.

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Watch every goal David Booth scored last season

At some point prior to last season, we at Pass it to Bulis pointed to David Booth as the key to the Canucks’ season. We were mocked. But we would like to point out that Booth had a pretty poor season, which, in the end, mirrored the Canucks season. So I’d say we were right. Who’s the man now, dog?

Booth was bought out at the end of the year, a move that we didn’t particularly agree with, but we can understand. The guy was one of Mike Gillis’s most divisive acquisitions, and with the new regime attempting to do away with all things Gillis in the hopes of selling their “change is coming” mantra, Booth had to go. Now he’s a Maple Leaf, like Mason Raymond before him, as Toronto continues in their bid to embarrass Vancouver as revenge for that weird half-season of Mats Sundin.

Anyway. Before we wipe Booth from our memory forever, always ruing the 20-goal season he never delivered, let’s take a moment to remember how he nearly got halfway there in 2013-14, finding the back of the net nine times. Here’s every goal the ex-Canuck scored last season.

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Watch every goal Tom Sestito scored last season

When Mike Gillis re-signed Tom Sestito on a one-way contract for two years last summer, it was met with a collective, “Really?” from the Canucks fanbase. Even the most ardent fan of enforcers could tell you that those numbers should have been reversed: a two-way contract for one year.

The previous season, Sestito barely saw the ice after getting claimed off waivers and was in and out of the press box. It wasn’t an expensive contract at $750,000 per season, but it was a baffling one. Enforcers like Sestito are easy to find in free agency or on the waiver wire, so committing to two years to a 25-year-old enforcer that had yet to even play a full season in the NHL made zero sense. It seemed like a continuation of the Bruins-obsession that marred Gillis’s work post-2011, focussing on finding a Shawn Thornton rather than a David Krejci.

Of course, no one expected Sestito to score as many goals as Alex Burrows during the 2013-14 season, even spending some time in the Canucks’ top six and on the first-unit powerplay. He even matched the goal total of last summer’s biggest name in free agency, David Clarkson, who got a 7-year deal worth $5.25 million per year. That’s an incredible value for $750,000! Good thing they locked him down for two years!

Except that it was a near-historically unlucky season for Burrows, while Sestito had the highest shooting percentage on the Canucks, to the point that he was actually incredibly fortunate to even score 5 goals. Sestito had a grand total of 31 shots on goal in the 77 games he played. Shawn Matthias played just 18 games for the Canucks and had more shots — 39 — than Sestito.

Now, with Jim Benning acquiring the far more useful fourth-liner Derek Dorsett via trade and younger players pushing their way up the depth chart, it’s unclear if Sestito will even have a spot on the roster for the second year of his contract. That may be for the best, as every single player on the Canucks has better possession statistics without Sestito than they do with him.

I have no explanation for why Sestito played in all but 5 games last season, aside from just shrugging my shoulders and saying “Tortorella,” but he did score five goals, which is five more than I’ll ever score in the NHL.

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Watch every goal Shawn Matthias scored last season

This isn’t actually every goal Shawn Matthias scored last season. The title is a lie, as Matthias arrived in Vancouver a few days before the trade deadline having already scored nine goals.

But we don’t concern ourselves with the goals he scored elsewhere — just the ones he scored in Vancouver, and Matthias had three of those, bouncing around the bottom three lines as the Canucks played out the string on a season that was already pretty well gone by the time he arrived.

It’ll be interesting to see what comes of his first full year in Vancouver. He’s big, he’s strong, he’s got some skill — but where he slots in, and whether or not he even plays at centre — remains to be seen. What doesn’t remain to be seen, however, are the goals he scored last season. Well. At least I’ve seen them. You haven’t yet. Get on that, you.

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Watch every goal Nicklas Jensen scored last season

Nicklas Jensen had one really good week in Vancouver. After finally earning his call-up, he made his presence felt, scoring three lovely goals in four games and leading fans to wonder if perhaps he was the real deal. Sadly, after that, he fell off, although it wasn’t entirely his fault. He was beginning to look good with Alex Burrows and Henrik Sedin, but then both of them got hurt. Heck, Burrows breaks his thumb on Jensen’s third goal.

But even now, knowing that he only scores three before the well dries up, it’s tough to look at these three goals and not get a little excited about the Danish winger’s goal-scoring ability. He’s got a great shot. Here are the first three goals of Nicklas Jensen’s career.

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Watch every goal Jordan Schroeder scored last season

One of Jim Benning’s first moves as General Manager wasn’t a move at all, but rather his decision not to move on Jordan Schroeder’s qualifying option. With a shrug, he sent the centre to unrestricted free agency instead, thus ending Schroeder’s relationship with the Canucks. Like Keith Ballard, he seized the opportunity to go home to Minnesota.

Cutting Schroeder loose is a defensible choice. While Benning said goodbye to an asset, and the practical cats over at Canucks Army would argue that this is foolish, the Canucks aren’t hoarders — they’re a hockey team, and one that determined the former first round pick had no value to them. For a small guy, he didn’t appear to have the speed or sizzle necessary to play on the top two lines, and his checking wasn’t particularly conducive to, y’know, a checking role. Worse, he’d probably built up some negative P.R. value as a Gillis draft pick, and the Canucks have spent much of the summer trying to get that “Gillis era” smell out of the franchise, for better or for worse. So they said goodbye to Jordan Schroeder.

And now, so do we. But before we do, we look back on his last three goals as a member of the Vancouver Canucks.

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Watch every goal Dale Weise scored last season

Dale Weise never really fit with the Canucks. As we’ve discussed previously, he arrived about a season too late for his vision of himself to line up with what the Canucks wanted from him.

Weise fancied himself a goal-scoring grinder; the Canucks wanted him to be a facepuncher who could play. That disconnect was never really resolved, and when John Tortorella arrived and discovered that Weise was unwilling to punch dudes with the frequency of Tom Sestito, he no longer had any use for him. Mike Gillis shopped him unabashedly, sending out a mass e-mail, and soon, Weise was in Montreal, where he’d eventually make quite the mark in the postseason and earn a contract extension.

But before he left, he did manage to pot three goals for the Canucks, which means he gets a post in our annual every goal series, where we look at the Canucks’ goal output, player by player, and observe their tendencies. In Weise’s case, his tendency is simple: he goes to the net, hopes the puck will follow, and then whacks at it until it goes where he wants it to. Simple and effective.

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Watch every goal Jason Garrison scored last season

Jason Garrison is gone now, moved to the Tampa Bay Lightning not long after Jim Benning arrived, look at the number of no-trade clauses he had to deal with and said, “Ugh.” Garrison was reportedly disappointed to have to go — he didn’t want to — but then he got the call from Stevie Yzerman, and everything changed.

There’s nothing quite like that call. When you answer the phone and Stephen Gregory Yzerman says, “I want you”, it’s life-changing. And when you’re expecting the call and you don’t get it, well, Marty St. Louis showed us how people react to that. It’s a very special call.

Anyway. Garrison’s gone. But not forgotten, and since he scored seven goals for the Canucks last year, that means he has to be accounted for in the annual every goal series. I hope you like one-timers!

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Watch every goal Alex Burrows scored last season

As scandalous as it was for John Tortorella to suggest the Canucks buy out Alex Burrows, it’s easy to understand why he might think that way. If this was the first year you’d ever really watched Alex Burrows play, I’m sure you’d be at a loss for why he was a fan favourite, let alone how he could possibly have cracked 25 goals in each of his last 4 full seasons in the NHL.

2013-14 was a horrible year for the Canuck winger. At some point, he was less a top-line winger than simply a metaphor for the entire team’s awful season: snake-bitten, beset by injuries, lacking confidence, bewildered as to what the heck was going on, excruciating to watch.

For much of the year, Burrows looked destined to be the best player to ever have a goalless season in the NHL. But eventually he managed to find his way, and with it, the back of the net. For about a week he knew how again, pouring in five in six days before returning to his carousel of injuries and bad bounces. So let’s take a moment to watch the five goals he did score, as we begin our annual, player-by-player look at every goal the Canucks scored last season with the man that closed last year’s series: Alex Burrows.

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