Stick in Link: Canucks have Fin, so they don’t need Thornton; coach hunt continues

It’s time for “Stick in Link”, the feature where we just plug in a bunch of stuff written by others! Featuring a smattering of links from around the Smylosphere and beyond every Tuesday and Thursday. Warning: our links are so hyper, they change colour when exposed to heat. (Have something for us to share in the next edition? E-mail us at passittobulis@gmail.com, tweet us @passittobulis, or just come over and write your link on a pad of paper, I guess.)

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• Benning on the David Booth buyout: “We took a look at the situation and talked about it with our pro scouting staff. David was getting paid a lot of money — money that probably a top-two-line player should be getting paid. And he hasn’t been able to accomplish that in Vancouver. We looked at this as a way to save some money on the salary cap and, as we go into free agency, we’ve freed up some money and maybe we can look at different things in free agency.” [Vancouver Sun]

• Thing I learned during this David Ebner eulogy for the David Booth era in Vancouver: Booth woke teammates from naps with his bird calls. What a weirdo. Anyway, this is really nicely written. [The Globe & Mail]

• If you needed another reason the Canucks shouldn’t sign Shawn Thornton, consider that they already have a Shawn Thornton type. His name is Fin. He is a man in an orca costume. [The Score]

• Following in the footsteps of the “Strombabble” series, which was successful despite its horrible, horrible, horrible name, Canucks Army debuts the even more horribly-named “Ryannuendo” series, which will follow the Ryan Kesler trade rumours and reports. [Canucks Army]

• Three names to watch in the Canucks’ coaching search. [NW Sports Beat]

• The Canucks have asked permission to speak to Scott Arniel, formerly of the Columbus Blue Jackets. But don’t fret: I’m pretty confident this is just a formality based on his previous relationship with the team. [Sportsnet]

• Mike Santorelli 100% wants to stay in Vancouver. One assumes this deal will get done. [PHT]

• Examining Shawn Matthias, whose size and versatility will probably prove pretty useful next year. [The Province]

• So what’s former Canuck Kyle Wellwood up to these days? He’s blogging for Telus, for some reason. [Telus]

• Ben Kuzma on Dale Weise, who got an extension yesterday with the Montreal Canadiens: “When I did a story on fourth-liners this season, Dale Weise didn’t respond to a question because at the time he had been bumped to the third line.” I’ve always loved Weise’s refusal to be typecast, even if it’s a little delusional. [The Province]

• Finally: somehow, the Canucks make this list of other teams, besides the Redskins, whose nicknames could be challenged by ethnic groups. What? [RStreet]

10 comments

  1. R.J. Lehmann
    June 18, 2014

    Yeah, that post was meant as kind of tongue-in-cheek.

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  2. Kent Basky
    June 18, 2014

    As an alcoholic lumberjack, I take great offense to the use of the word ‘Canucks’ for a sports team. I demand they change it to something less offensive, like maybe the Vancouver Aquamammals…

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  3. NYCanucklehead
    June 18, 2014

    “the character of Johnny Canuck had emerged as a rival to Uncle Sam, except portrayed as a dim-witted lumberjack” WTF???!!!! And no mention of his war-time origins to describe the resilient Canadian forces??? This person needs to do more research. This actually angers me.

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    • Neil B
      June 18, 2014

      Well, Johnny Canuck wasn’t the original logo of the team, as the article asserts. He originated as a political cartoon in the 1860′s, and then came out of ‘retirement’ to help the Canadian wartime effort in the 1940s, as you rightly noted. Since Leo Balche’s clean-cut hero doesn’t look much like the scruffy lumberjack –and the popular application of the name to all Canadian soldiers in WWII–kinda takes the stink of prejudice off the name, they probably chose to ignore those facts for the article.

      As the motto on my family coat of arms says: “Ut ne in via bona fama rerum”.

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    • Scott
      June 19, 2014

      Considering the author insists there are only 6 Canadian NHL teams, I can assure you no research was done.

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  4. R.J. Lehmann
    June 18, 2014

    I’m aware of the use of Johnny Canuck in WWII, although the character is almost a century older than that. This post is not intended as an exhaustive history of the character, or of the term Canuck. It’s simply a light-hearted overview of some other North American pro team names that many do not realize actually originated as ethnic slurs or euphemisms. Canuck does fit that bill.

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    • Snepsts
      June 20, 2014

      LOL @ white people. There is no such thing as a “slur” against white westerners of any kind. Slurs are derogatory terms directed at people of color, not humorous stereotypes of whites by other whites. Get over yourselves.

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  5. Amor de Cosmos
    June 18, 2014

    Another theory has it that ‘Canuck’ is derived from Kanaka, who were the Pacific Islanders — mainly Hawaiians — who worked here in BC in the early 19th Century.

    You can choose your poison.

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  6. ikillchicken
    June 19, 2014

    Ug. That is a terrible name for a column speculating about possible Kesler trades. Clearly they should have called it “Keslerbation”.

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  7. DanD
    June 19, 2014

    I am excited to see what a healthy and motivated Santorelli can add to the lineup next season. I hope he can stay healthy this time!

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