Big Numbers: Last chance to see Selanne; Kassian tallies assists, Hamhuis draws penalties

Every now and then we like to take a break from all the words and just post some numbers. And some words describing the numbers, as otherwise it would just be a whole bunch of numbers with no context, which would be really weird. Big Numbers is a weekly feature on Pass it to Bulis in which we identify the numbers and statistics that really matter or, frequently, the ones that don’t matter at all but are still pretty interesting.

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91 | Points for Teemu Selanne in 77 career games against the Vancouver Canucks. That’s the highest points-per-game for Selanne against any Western Conference opponent in his career. He’ll be in town tonight for his final game in Vancouver, unless the Canucks somehow beat the odds and make the playoffs.

0.0315% | The Canucks current chance to make the playoffs according to Sports Club Stats. So, yeah, this is the last chance to see Teemu Selanne in Vancouver.

2.7% | The Canucks current chance to get the first overall pick in the draft lottery. As you can see, it’s far more likely that the Canucks get the first overall pick than they make the playoffs.

78 | Games played for Jason Garrison, leading the Canucks. If he can stay healthy through the Canucks’ remaining 4 games, he’ll be the only player to appear in every game this season.

8 | Points for Zack Kassian in his last 6 games, bringing him up to 27 on the season. That’s more points than Daniel Briere, Dustin Brown, and Teemu Selanne, but still one fewer than Mike Santorelli, who remains 6th on the Canucks in points despite not playing since January 16th.

1.84 | Kassian’s points per 60 minutes, which is second on the Canucks behind Henrik Sedin. You have to wonder if Kassian would have a lot more points this season if he had averaged more than 12:47 per game in ice time.

14 | Kassian’s assists this season. His assist against the Kings on Saturday gave him more assists than goals for the first time this season, which seems insane given how well he passes the puck when he’s on his game.

+11 | Dan Hamhuis’s penalty differential this season leading both the Canucks (tied with Daniel Sedin) and all NHL defencemen. It is incredibly difficult for a defenceman to avoid taking penalties, but Hamhuis has just 12 minor penalties this season while drawing 23. He’s one of just 28 defencemen to have a positive penalty differential while playing at least 40 games.

24:04 | Hamhuis’s team-leading ice time, which makes his penalty differential all the more impressive. He also has positive puck possession while starting more shifts in the defensive zone and facing tougher competition than any other Canucks defenceman.

60 | The number of goals the Canucks have scored with Hamhuis on the ice at 5-on-5, leading all Canucks by 13 goals. That’s also good for 11th in the league among defencemen, making it particularly impressive considering the Canucks overall scoring troubles. His personal offensive numbers may down from the last couple seasons, but Hamhuis is actually having a very solid year.

3.9 | The Canucks’ shooting percentage when Alex Edler is on the ice at 5-on-5, which isn’t just the worst on the Canucks, but is also the worst among all NHL defencemen. If you’re looking for the main reason why Edler is tied for the worst +/- in the league among defencemen, this is it. If his on-ice shooting percentage was closer to the 7.2% from last season or 7.5% from the season before, his +/- would be close to even.

182 | The number of goals the Canucks have scored this season. They have 4 games to score 10 goals; otherwise, the Canucks will set a franchise low for goals scored in a non-lockout year. Their current record low was 192 goals in 1998-99. The Canucks finished last in the Western Conference that season and, after a series of trades, selected Daniel and Henrik Sedin with the second and third overall picks in the following draft.

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10 comments

  1. Brent
    April 7, 2014

    Yes if Kassian played more with a bona fida 3rd line centre rather than Richards, and if Booth had had a little more puck luck (or just shooting skill (Hockey shooting skill that is) (are you allowed to put brackets between brackets?))) his assists would be higher. Don’t get me wrong, Richards is a great 4th line centre and great on the penalty kill, but not exactly an offensive genius. I am actually somewhat optimistic about Kassian next year, which is saying a lot from me. Now if he just wouldn’t injure anyone for a while…….

    So are we showcasing Hamhuis to trade him? Just kidding!

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  2. arjay
    April 7, 2014

    re: “You have to wonder if Kassian would have a lot more points this season if he had averaged more than 12:47 per game in ice time.”

    Unaccustomed as I am to being a contrarian, I will give it a go.

    Specifically, the only reason that ZK has evolved into a scoring role is BECAUSE he was only playing 12:47 per game. That is, he watched and learned from the bench. He may be the only Nuck to actually benefit from Torts’ short stay in Vancouver……Had he been given MORE ice time earlier this season, I believe he would have been messing up more and stapled to the bench or worse.

    The more I see of this very young “man-child” the more I believe he will blossom into a genuine 2nd line RW-er; a rare combo of grit and “hands”……I say 2nd line as the nux are likely to go after a top flight right winger (can you say Vanek?) to make the Sedin’s a pure scoring line and to recoup the money they just spent for the next 4 years of Sedinery. (with all respect to AB)

    Glad to see the patience with ZK paying off……here’s hoping it continues for many more years.

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    • Lemming
      April 7, 2014

      Vanek is going to cost a ton. There’s no way the Canucks get him.

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      • Daniel Wagner
        April 7, 2014

        It all depends on whether the Canucks trade Ryan Kesler and/or use a compliance buyout David Booth. If they do both, that’s an extra $9.25 million in capspace in addition to whatever space they already have, not counting whatever player(s) come back in a Kesler deal. At that point, they can sign whatever big name free agent they want.

        I personally think the Canucks should keep both Kesler and Booth, simply because I’m not overly thrilled with the free agent options out there, but if they want to sign someone like Vanek, Stastny, Cammalleri, or Hemsky, they can certainly do it. I wouldn’t mind Hemsky, actually, but only if they keep Kesler.

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        • Lemming
          April 7, 2014

          I would imagine Vanek is going to get 7+, because free agents are always expensive. Kesler isn’t quite the sniper that Vanek is, but sure he’s just as (probably more) valuable than Vanek.

          Booth, I’d rather see stay too, because he’s generally undervalued.

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          • Daniel Wagner
            April 8, 2014

            Undervalued and overpaid. Rare combination.

            I think there’s a scenario where the Canucks could keep both Kesler and Booth and sign Ales Hemsky, who is the type of playmaking winger that it seems Kesler needs, but it would take some wheeling and dealing around the edges to make sure there’s enough room and it depends on how much Hemsky wants and whether he wants to come back to the Western Conference.

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            • Chocoball
              April 8, 2014

              Isnt kass maturing into a playmaking winger? Why not try kes between booth and kass?

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              • Daniel Wagner
                April 8, 2014

                I’m all for it.

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    • ikillchicken
      April 7, 2014

      I’d agree with you completely, prior to the Olympics. He had played on the 3rd line for most of this season because that is where he belonged. And his development was without a doubt better for it. That said, I really have to question why he is still playing there now. The way he has played the last month or so, surely he has earned a promotion to the 2nd line. And just imagine what he could do playing with Burr and Kesler instead Booth and Richardson.

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      • PD
        April 8, 2014

        I don’t know, I’m not sure one can necessarily project his current production onto another line and assume it will improve due to the linemates being better players. That line Kassian is on seems to play really well together and I’d be wary of breaking it up. I’m no coach but I think solid lines that stay together long enough to start working well together are a good thing of which this team has had far too little.

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