Big Numbers: Awesome penalty kill, awful power play; high and low PDO

Every now and then we like to take a break from all the words and just post some numbers. And some words describing the numbers, as otherwise it would just be a whole bunch of numbers with no context, which would be really weird. Big Numbers is a weekly feature on Pass it to Bulis in which we identify the numbers and statistics that really matter or, frequently, the ones that don’t matter at all but are still pretty interesting.

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89.4 | The Canucks’ penalty kill percentage, enough to lead the NHL. The Canucks have killed off 22 straight penalties and have gone 7 games without allowing a powerplay goal. It appears that the Canucks are worried about this being unfair for other teams, so have endeavoured not to score any powerplay goals themselves: the Canucks are 2-for-28 with the man-advantage over the last 7 games.

62 | The Canucks’ total number of powerplay opportunities, which is tied for 13th in the NHL. The Canucks can no longer point to the number of powerplays they’ve been given for why they’re not scoring powerplay goals, as they’re now around the league average.

28 | Cole Cassels’ points in 21 games, leading all Canucks’ prospects and good enough for 14th in the OHL in scoring. The two-way center suddenly finds himself playing as a first-line winger at times for the Oshawa Generals, particularly on the powerplay, and is making the most of it. The Canucks’ 3rd round pick in the 2013 draft already has 12 goals, just three shy of his total from last season, including an impressive four-goal performance against the Ottawa 67′s.

37.4 | The number of shots against per 60 minutes of ice time for Tom Sestito, which is the second worst on team, ahead of only Zac Dalpe, who has played in half as many games as Sestito. Sestito has struggled in his own end at times this season, leading to some long shifts hemmed in the defensive zone, but he saw some improvement over the weekend while skating on a line with Brad Richardson and Zack Kassian, scoring his first goal of the season on Sunday against the Ducks.

1114 | Darren Archibald’s PDO (combination of on-ice shooting and save percentages; in general, anything too far above or below 1000 is likely to regress over the course of the season). Archibald has not looked out of place during his call-up and could conceivably earn a longer stay with the Canucks on the fourth line once players start returning from injury, but he’s also benefitted from some friendly percentages that have made him look a little better than he truly is. Archibald’s been on the ice for 4 goals for and only 1 against in his 8 games.

878 | On the flip side is Alex Burrows, who has had little to no luck when he’s been on the ice so far this season. The Canucks’ shooting percentage with him on the ice is a below-average 5.7%, while the save percentage is .821, which is appallingly low. His resultant PDO of 878 is one of the worst in the league. This stretch of bad luck is unlikely to continue over the course of the season and is part of the reason he has just 2 points in 8 games.

75 | Ryan Kesler continues to shoot the lights out and is 3rd in the league in total shots. He’s been taking a ton of shots all season, but being the trigger man on the Sedin line has certainly helped. At his current rate, he’ll end the season with ~307 shots, the highest total of his career by 47 shots. At his career average shooting percentage of 11.9% (he’s currently at 12.0%), he’ll score ~37 goals, just four goals shy of his career-high of 41 set in the 2010-11 season.

.911, 2.41 | The save percentage and goals against average of both Roberto Luongo and Eddie Lack. The two goaltenders have identical stats 20 games in, showing some serious solidarity. Sounds like that dinner went really well.

10 | The number of games Jason Garrison has gone without a point after starting the season with 9 points in his first 10 games. The underlying puck possession stats aren’t in his favour either: he’s the only Canucks defenceman with a Corsi% below 50%, indicating that opposing teams have more shot attempts than the Canucks when he is on the ice. The Canucks have been outscored 12-7 with Garrison on the ice at even-strength and he has lost his spot on the first unit on the powerplay. Garrison was solid last season by both his offensive totals and his puck possession stats, so there’s reason to believe he can turn things around, but there’s a reason his ice time has been declining.

50 | Dan Hamhuis’s goal against the Los Angeles Kings on Saturday was the 50th of his career. Now that’s getting a lot more powerplay time, he can look forward to many more in the future.

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13 comments

  1. TimeToGo
    November 11, 2013

    Have you guys compiled any stats on which teams the Sedins score against? The twins going scoreless the last three games (San Jose, LA, ANA) does not bode well for the playoffs.

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    • Daniel Wagner
      November 11, 2013

      You can see splits at hockey-reference.com. I’m not too worried about a few games, particularly since Henrik had a 12-game point streak prior to those three games, but it is something worth looking at later in the season when we have a larger sample size of games.

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      • NarkusMaslund
        November 12, 2013

        Personally, I’m not too worried about the Sedins, specifically, having trouble scoring against certain teams. I’m more worried about the team as a whole having trouble scoring against certain teams.

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  2. primetime
    November 11, 2013

    Might get flogged for this, but what does PDO stand for? Public Display of Offense?

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    • Daniel Wagner
      November 11, 2013

      Regrettably, it doesn’t stand for anything. PDO was the username of the guy who came up with the idea of adding shooting percentage and save percentage together to get a standard “luck” statistic of some sort. People ran with the idea and developed some pretty interesting ways of using it and the PDO name stuck.

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      • primetime
        November 11, 2013

        Thanks for the info Daniel.

        I know there is a post regarding the terms and stats used on your blog. Is that still available?

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        • Harrison Mooney
          November 11, 2013

          Yessir. It’s right here.

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  3. Naturalmystic
    November 11, 2013

    .911 was an inside job…..

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    • Rory
      November 11, 2013

      I REALLY hope signs like this start showing up at Canucks games!

      I think Canucks fans should embrace the spirit of strombone1 and become the leagues most demented fan-base.

      *Heads to NHL.com to order a strombone1 jersey*

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  4. Aaron
    November 12, 2013

    Going out and ordering mine today!

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